Clinical research
Correlation between eye and ear symptoms and lack of teeth, bruxism and other parafunctions in a population of 1006 patients in 2003-2008
 
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Submission date: 2011-06-10
Final revision date: 2011-10-28
Acceptance date: 2011-10-28
Online publication date: 2012-02-29
Publication date: 2012-03-01
 
Arch Med Sci 2012;8(1):104–110
 
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ABSTRACT
Introduction: Parafunctions (harmful habits) play a crucial role in the formation of temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction syndrome with disc displacement. Disorder symptoms in temporo-mandibular joints manifest themselves in the eye and ear but are usually not associated with the dysfunction of temporo-mandibular joints and that might lead to errors in diagnosis. The aim of the study was to examine the influence of missing teeth and parafunctions on the occurrence of ear and eye symptoms in patients treated in the Department of Prosthodontics of the Medical University of Lublin.
Material and methods: The patient group consisted of 753 women and 253 men aged 10 to 82 years who had been treated in the Department of Prosthodontics, Medical University of Lublin in the years 2003-2008 due to various symptoms associated with temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction.
Results: Eye (24.84%, n = 785) and ear (33.38%, n = 785) syndromes occur on average more often in patients with parafunctions than without them (15.98%, n = 219 and 23.29%, n = 219). However, only parafunctions involving tooth contact should be taken into consideration when diagnosing eye and ear syndromes. The data presented here show that the number of missing teeth does not have a significant influence on the frequency of occurrence of parafunctions. Parafunctions have become a very important factor in the diagnosis of diseases and pathological symptoms of eye and ear as the rate at which they occur is growing.
Conclusions : The kind of parafunction is very important. Only those involving tooth contact should be taken into consideration when diagnosing eye and ear syndromes.
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