BASIC RESEARCH
Influence of far upstream element binding protein 1 gene on chemotherapy sensitivity in human U251 glioblastoma cells
 
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Submission date: 2013-11-28
Final revision date: 2014-03-16
Acceptance date: 2014-04-02
Online publication date: 2016-02-02
Publication date: 2016-02-29
 
Arch Med Sci 2016;12(1):156–162
 
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ABSTRACT
Introduction: The aim of this study was to determine the influence of the far upstream element binding protein 1 gene (FUBP1) on chemotherapy sensitivity in human U251 glioblastoma cells.
Material and methods: Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to determine the expression of the FUBP1 gene in 43 cases of human brain gliomas. Western blot analysis was used to determine the inhibitory effect of RNA interference on FUBP1 gene expression. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay (MTT) and flow cytometry methods were used to determine the growth inhibitory rate and apoptosis rate of the U251 cells with FUBP1 silencing. The growth inhibitory rate and apoptosis rate were further determined after treatment of those U251 cells with cisplatin (DDP).
Results: The expression of FUBP1 mRNA was up-regulated significantly in gliomas, 177.65% as much as in peri-cancerous tissues (p < 0.05). The expression of FUBP1 protein was inhibited significantly with siRNA-FUBP1 (p < 0.05). In FUBP1-silenced cells, the growth inhibitory rate increased from 1.4% to 29.5%, and the apoptosis rate increased from 2.68% to 5.84% (p < 0.05 for both). After treating with DDP at various concentrations (1, 3, 5 µg/ml), the growth inhibitory rate of FUBP1-silenced cells increased from 14.42%, 17.46% and 23.55% to 21.69%, 27.51% and 37.57%; the apoptosis rate increased from 8.85%, 14.37% and 18.21% to 13.25%, 18.46% and 26.52%.
Conclusions: The up-regulation of FUBP1 relates to the carcinogenesis of gliomas. FUBP1 silencing increases the growth inhibitory rate and apoptosis rate of the U251 cells, and enhances the chemotherapy sensitivity of U251 cells to DDP.
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ISSN:1734-1922