Clinical research
A single dose of celecoxib 200 mg improves postoperative analgesia provided via patient-controlled epidural technique after caesarean section
 
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Submission date: 2011-10-31
Final revision date: 2012-01-19
Acceptance date: 2012-01-29
Online publication date: 2012-10-16
Publication date: 2013-10-31
 
Arch Med Sci 2013;9(5):877–882
 
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ABSTRACT
Introduction: Celecoxib in a dose of 200 mg is safe for the breast feeding mother, as its milk levels are extremely low. We investigated the efficacy of celecoxib in improving postoperative pain management in parturients under patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA).
Material and methods: We studied 64 healthy parturients undergoing elective caesarean section under combined spinal-epidural anesthesia. Postoperative analgesia was performed via PCEA with ropivacaine 0.15% and fentanyl 2 µg/ml (4 ml bolus administration, lock-out 15 min). Patients were randomly allocated to receive either only PCEA (n = 32) or PCEA plus celecoxib 200 mg orally (n = 32). Paracetamol 500 mg was given orally as rescue analgesia. We recor­ded visual analogue scale (VAS) scores for pain at rest and movement, attemp­ted and given PCEA doses, Bromage scores, level of sensory blockade, rescue doses of paracetamol, maternal side effects during the first 24 h after the PCEA instrumentation, and the overall patient satisfaction.
Results: Fifty-six patients completed the entire protocol. Patient demographics, duration of surgery, side effects, attempted and given PCEA doses, and motor and sensory blockade did not differ between the groups. Significantly lower VAS scores at rest and movement, fewer paracetamol doses (p = 0.039) and increased patient satisfaction (p = 0.001) were found in the celecoxib group compared to controls.
Conclusions: A single dose of 200 mg of celecoxib effectively improved pain management in parturients with PCEA, limited the need for supplemental analgesics and improved efficacy of analgesia, increasing patient satisfaction.
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