CLINICAL RESEARCH
Prognostic value of assessment of stool and serum IL-1β, IL-1ra and IL-6 concentrations in children with active and inactive ulcerative colitis
 
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Submission date: 2017-02-20
Final revision date: 2017-05-21
Acceptance date: 2017-06-05
Online publication date: 2017-06-30
Publication date: 2017-12-20
 
Arch Med Sci 2018;14(1):107–114
 
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ABSTRACT
Introduction: Interleukin-1b (IL-1β), interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) contribute to the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis (UC). The aim of our study was to evaluate the serum and stool IL-1β, IL-1ra and IL-6 concentrations as potential prognostic factors in children with UC.
Material and methods: Thirty-eight children with UC (20 active, 18 inactive) and 14 healthy controls were prospectively included in the study. IL-1β, IL-1ra and IL-6 concentrations were measured in serum and stool supernatants at inclusion to the study using ELISA immunoassays. The children were followed up over 5 years, and at each follow-up clinical disease activity, quantity and severity of relapses, nutritional status, endoscopic and histopathologic activity, disease complications and the treatment regimen were evaluated.
Results: In children with active and inactive UC who had relapsed during a 5-year follow-up period compared to the non-relapse groups we found significantly increased serum IL-1β (1.34 vs. 0.98 pg/ml, p < 0.05, and 1.02 vs. 0.68 pg/ml, p < 0.01, respectively,) and IL-1ra (718.0 vs. 453.2 pg/ml, p < 0.05, and 567.4 vs. 365.1 pg/ml, p < 0.01, respectively). Additionally, in children who had experienced complications during a 5-year follow-up period we observed significantly increased serum and stool IL-1β (p < 0.05) and serum IL-1ra (p < 0.01) compared to the group without complications.
Conclusions: We concluded that serum IL-1β and IL-1ra and to a lesser extend stool IL-1β concentrations may be useful prognostic factors in children with active and inactive UC over a short-term follow-up period, which may help to identify children that require more aggressive therapy due to an increased risk of relapse or complications resulting from UC.
eISSN:1896-9151
ISSN:1734-1922