CLINICAL RESEARCH
Preoperative immunonutrition regulates tumor infiltrative lymphocytes and increases tumor angiogenesis in gastric cancer patients
 
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Submission date: 2015-04-28
Final revision date: 2015-07-26
Acceptance date: 2015-08-06
Online publication date: 2016-05-19
Publication date: 2017-10-30
 
Arch Med Sci 2017;13(6):1365–1372
 
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ABSTRACT
Introduction: An increased number of tumor infiltrative lymphocytes (TILs) is considered a favorable prognostic factor in various cancers because it is a marker of antitumoral activity of the immune system. In this prospective, non-randomized clinical trial, we evaluated the impact of preoperative immunonutrition on tumor infiltrative lymphocytes and neoangiogenesis in cancerous tissue in patients with locoregional and resectable gastric adenocarcinoma.
Material and methods: Patients with locoregional and resectable gastric adenocarcinoma were divided non-randomly into two study groups. The first (control) group included patients who had standard nutrition, and the second group included those who had immunonutrition for 7 days before surgery. The biopsy samples taken endoscopically in the preoperative period, as well as the gastrectomy samples, were subjected to immunohistochemical staining for quantitative analysis of CD4, CD8, CD16, CD56, CD31 and CD105 antibodies. Main outcome measures were CD4-to-CD8 ratio and CD105 levels.
Results: Fifty patients were included in the study between January 2013 and December 2014. Twenty-five patients were assigned to each of the first and second group. The CD4-to-CD8 ratio and CD105 levels determined in endoscopic biopsy samples were similar in both groups. The CD4-to-CD8 ratio in gastrectomy samples was significantly higher in the first group (p = 0.0001). The CD105 levels in gastrectomy samples were significantly lower in the first group (p = 0.01).
Conclusions: Seven-day preoperative immunonutrition use regulates TILs in gastric cancer patients, but prolonged use increases tumor angiogenesis.
eISSN:1896-9151
ISSN:1734-1922